What future for curriculum history? The pedagogy of history in the primary phase and an analysis of ITT students’ experience and preparation for the classroom

Abstract

The data utilised in this document was collected from Initial Teacher Training (ITT) students completing postgraduate and undergraduate courses and relates to the experience (personally as a pupil and in school as a student) of those participating in curriculum history sessions learning about how to teach in the primary sector.

As ever, the nature of the Primary Curriculum requires students to interpret the delivery of their teaching programme through a multiplicity of subject areas and to adapt their teaching styles accordingly. This investigation focuses on the individual involvement of students teaching, observing as well as being taught the subject in Primary. Impending curriculum modifications are once again on the Government’s agenda so perhaps this is particularly pertinent currently.

In considering the position of students undergoing school and university preparation to teach and the provision offered to them to experience observing and teaching the subject in isolation and as one of a multi-subject curricular methodology once they are qualified, I reflect on some conclusions characterised by their responses. It is important to acknowledge that student interpretations regarding approaches to history as a subject might be subjective, but I document these in order to review likely influences on the standard of their teaching, so a range of analysis to reflect this is included.

The outcomes here represent first responses to my research. A further data collection will be undertaken with the cohort of ITT students in 2012-2013, to see how, and if, Government planned changes in ITT and curriculum influence the preparation of students to teach history.

Checkley, C. (2012) What future for curriculum history? The pedagogy of history in the primary phase and an analysis of ITT students’ experience and preparation for the classroom. Educationalfutures, [online] Vol. 1(5). Available at: http://educationstudies.org.uk/?p=611 [Accessed 18 Nov, 2017].